Digital X-RAY

Digital radiography is a form of X-ray imaging, where digital X-ray sensors are used instead of traditional photographic film. Advantages include time efficiency through bypassing chemical processing and the ability to digitally transfer and enhance images. Also, less radiation can be used to produce an image of similar contrast to conventional radiography.
Computed radiography (CR) uses very similar equipment to conventional radiography except that in place of a film to create the image, an imaging plate (IP) made of photostimulable phosphor is used. The imaging plate is housed in a special cassette and placed under the body part or object to be examined and the x-ray exposure is made. Hence, instead of taking an exposed film into a darkroom for developing in chemical tanks or an automatic film processor, the imaging plate is run through a special laser scanner, or CR reader, that reads and digitizes the image. The digital image can then be viewed and enhanced using software that has functions very similar to other conventional digital image-processing software, such as contrast, brightness, filtration and zoom.

Preparation

Different types of X-rays require different preparations. Some procedures will require preparations lasting days for clearer image and perfect study.
What to wear
In general, you undress whatever part of your body needs examination. You may wear a gown during the exam, depending on which area is being X-rayed. You may also be asked to remove jewelry, eyeglasses and any metal objects because they can show up on an X-ray.
Contrast material
Before some types of X-rays, you're given a liquid called contrast medium. Contrast mediums, such as barium and iodine, help outline a specific area of your body on the X-ray image. You may swallow the contrast medium or receive it as an injection or an enema.

Procedure for X RAY
A technologist positions your body to obtain the necessary views. He or she may use pillows or sandbags to help you hold the position. During the X-ray exposure, you remain still and sometimes hold your breath to avoid moving so that the image doesn't blur.
An X-ray procedure may take from a few minutes for a bone X-ray to more than an hour for more-involved procedures, such as those using a contrast medium.
Your child's X-ray
If a young child is having an X-ray, restraints or other techniques may be used to keep him or her still. These won't harm your child and will prevent the need for a repeat procedure, which may be necessary if the child moves during the X-ray exposure.
You may be allowed to remain with your child during the test. If you remain in the room during the X-ray exposure, you'll likely be asked to wear a lead apron to shield you from unnecessary exposure.
After an X-ray, you generally can resume normal activities. Routine X-rays usually have no side effects. However, if you're injected with contrast medium before your X-rays, drink plenty of fluids to help rid your body of it.
X-Ray images are printed on films and handed over within in 15min. However some special X-RAY procedure test will require radiologist report which will take more time depending upon the complexity of the test.